Spotlight Interview: Lois McMaster Bujold Returns!

Layout 1

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is happy to welcome back Lois McMaster Bujold to our Spotlight interview space. Nominated ten times for the Hugo Award for the Best Novel, she’s won that category four times, as well as garnering another Hugo for best novella, three Nebula Awards, three Locus Awards, the Mythopoeic Award, two Sapphire Awards, the Minnesota Book Award, the Forry Award, and the Skylark Award. In 2007, she was given the Ohioana Career Award, and in 2008, she was the writer Guest-of-Honor at the 66th World Science Fiction convention. Her works have been translated into over twenty languages. This week released her newest novel in her popular Vorkosigan Saga, Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen, to which she’s given the tag line, “If Jane Austen goes on a blind date with Matt Ridley. They hit it off surprisingly well.”

Welcome back to our blog! Last time we chatted, Captain Vorpatril’s Alliance had come out and we talked about him and Miles Vorkosigan. With the re-release of Shards of Honor last November and February’s release of Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen, we return to the character of Cordelia Naismith Vorkosigan. While I’m happy we are returning to Cordelia, what about her story called you to return to it now? And for readers less familiar with the books, what were some of your first inspirations and plans when you started writing Cordelia’s character?

LMB: Cordelia was the heroine of my very first book, Shards of Honor, which I started way back in 1982. It was also my first book published, in 1986, and launched my career. My first goal was simply to write, and finish, a novel, which I did with more than a little help from my friends; people can read more about the genesis of the series in The Vorkosigan Companion. I suppose making the protagonist a woman of about my own (then) age made the project just that much less daunting, when I was trying to bootstrap up so many new skills all at once in the midst of preschool children, intermittent poverty, and a difficult marriage. But I can hardly dub anything back then a plan; it was all just scrambling from crisis to crisis and trying to stay afloat as best as I could.

It’s been a long, strange trip in the three decades since then for both me and Cordelia.   After The Warrior’s Apprentice, which jumped ahead 17 book-years to the beginning adventures of her son Miles, Cordelia was rather elbowed out of the spotlight, as seems to be parents’ fates in fiction. But as she firmly dodged the bullet of dying young sometimes literally meted out to fictional mothers (“That’ll shut them up!”), she continued as a minor but pivotal character in Miles’s next-generation saga. After the events of Cryoburn, which shoved Miles into his third new identity of his life and the series, fan after fan asked how he was coping with the changes, to which I thought the answer was obvious; he shoulders his new duties and carries on. But it gradually came to me that while Miles’s life narrowed at this stage, Cordelia’s opened out. That was new and unexplored country, and what better place to set it than on the new and unexplored planet of Sergyar?

With the intense focus on YA and coming-of-age tropes in fantasy and science fiction, older characters are less heard-from, partly I suspect, because they are generationally too alien not only to young readers – and protagonists — but to younger writers. It reminds me a little about how some writers have trouble writing characters of the opposite gender; they have no idea how those Others really think, so default to stereotypes. Having time-traveled the hard way into this later stage of life myself, reporting from the new landscape seemed an interestingly under-trodden path to follow.   Particularly when also examining the impact of new science and technologies on possible extended-life choices.

I should add: the first two Cordelia books, Shards of Honor and its direct sequel, the Hugo-winning Barrayar, have recently been reissued by Baen Books in lovely, non-eye-straining trade paperback format, with new, coordinated cover art. I had the chance to give them both a fresh copy edit, too, and clean up old, lingering errata from the text. I’m very pleased to have them both out again in time for the new Cordelia book.    

 

As a natural researcher and lover of science, what have been some of your favorite adventures in researching your books? Would you share a time when you might have been surprised in your research or when something you’ve discovered or a new scientific discovery might have affected your writing and plotting?

LMB: I am certainly a pop science fan. Besides PBS’s Nature and NOVA, I pick up a lot of science DVDs – I was most impressed recently with the two 5-parters The Brain with David Eagleman about the latest in neurobiology, and First Peoples, a round-up on the latest in human evolution, which is a field developing so fast that any writings older than a couple of years are out of date. I also rec Your Inner Fish by Neil Shubin, both the book and the show. I am likewise a fan of science writer Nick Lane, for his splendid books Oxygen and Power, Sex, Suicide.

And, of course, very pertinent to my new book, Matt Ridley’s classic The Red Queen: Sex and the Evolution of Human Nature. All of this accumulation gets piled up in one big compost heap of dimly remembered knowledge to inform my stories. If I venture into any very technical detail, I also like to run it past an expert to spot gaffes; happily, my SF writing career has brought me an impressive stable of willing fans able to vet my work at need.

While you’re writing, how much control do you have or exert over the plot compared to how much the characters’ personalities and choices move things along? Have you ever been surprised, in writing, when the plot has taken an odd turn or the character has done something unexpected? And if so, what happened?

LMB: It’s always a continuous-feedback process, all elements of a story – characters, action, setting, dialogue, props, throw-away lines that suddenly fire back — fueling and changing the others. Every scene written has the possibility of altering what could come next. Nevertheless, I’ve often stalled out when what seemed a perfectly good, rational plot development stops the story dead, instead. My characters don’t so much do the unexpected or “run away with the story”, as go on sit-down strike till I give them the right things to do.

My “outlines”, so-called, are more a cross between memory aids and very rough first drafts. I don’t make up the tale as I’m sitting in front of the computer, but rather, when I’m moving around doing other things. (But not when surfing the internet, which is antithetical to such creative meditation.) I capture these thoughts in notes in pencil, and when I have a scene-sized accumulation, shoved into order, then I go sit and actually write it all out, editing and improving as I go.

That said, the character of Earl Wencel Horseriver, as he developed in The Hallowed Hunt, notably hijacked the story. The most important relationship in the tale was supposed to have been between the hero and the heroine, not between the hero and the villain!

02052016 - Bujold Pic 2

For newer writers just starting, what advice would you give them for world (or galaxy) building? What should writers consider if they want to have a rich culture for their characters to live in—and well-developed worlds for characters to explore (and possibly get into trouble)?

LMB: For a guide to thinking through the mechanics of one’s worldbuilding, a really excellent resource is this: http://www.sfwa.org/2009/08/fantasy-worldbuilding-questions/

Beyond that (which will take you a while), for me worldbuilding is tightly interlocked with characterization and viewpoint. Every character is the center of their own universe, and even for characters in the same story, that world will be uniquely different, in what they can see, what they notice, what they think about it. As a result, I often do my worldbuilding backwards, from the inside out – I start with a character, and then start reasoning my way to the world that must exist around him, from immediate situation to family history, culture and geography, world history, and so on. As long as all the links are in place and sound by the time you finish, it doesn’t matter which ones you start with.

On the business side of writing, what advice could you give to authors who want to make a career out of writing? Particularly in SF and fantasy?

LMB: Again, for the basics I can do no better than to recommend Wrede on Writing by Patricia C. Wrede. https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/18885487-wrede-on-writing

The business of writing has changed so much since I broke in (sounds like a caper heist!) to publishing back in the mid-1980s, I hardly feel qualified to give advice. Also, the world has gone from being devoid of informative resources (at least, mine was) to being flooded with them. But one thing hasn’t changed; one still learns to write fiction by actually sitting down and writing fiction. And the very best thing one can do for one’s story or one’s career is to sit down and write more fiction. All this promotional and para-writing activity that is currently recommended is all very well, but not if starts interfering with that core task. Over and over, I have seen that the best boost to my sales is a new work.

02052016 - Bujold Pic 1

What is/are your passions when you’re not writing? How do you make time for your non-writing hobbies/things you love?

LMB: My main pastimes – reading and watching DVDs, both fiction and non-fiction – blend with my work, rather. I am especially fond of animation and anime, and good pop sci programming. I spend the necessary time on home, life, and health maintenance chores, all pretty stripped down and simplified these days. I don’t get enough exercise and outdoor exercise, though I do get some.

“Making time” is much less of an issue now than when I was younger and had to carve it out of the chaos by force. I sometimes wish I could shoot some of these leisure hours back in time to the younger me, who needed them so desperately, but oh well. The new limiting factor is not time, but interest and energy.

I’m not sure that I love the internet, but it sure does vacuum up any spare time left lying around. Sort of like a continuously operating time-Roomba. I also spend more time on para-writing and career-maintenance tasks, both made possible by and delivered by the internet, than I used to. On the other hand, I also pull some of that pop sci programming off pbs.org, so.

What is one thing that most people don’t realize about you that you’d like to share?

LMB: Well, one that comes up fairly frequently is my surname, which is Bujold. Starting with B. Not McMaster Bujold, McMaster-Bujold, or any other variant. McMaster is my maiden name, which I now use for my middle name. This is only important because books are filed alphabetically by their writers’ last names, and if it is gotten wrong, people will be looking for my books in the wrong place and not finding them.

The late Dutch writer Robert Van Gulik, author of the fascinating Judge Dee mysteries, had a similar problem, back when; some libraries and bookstores filed his work under “V”, some under “G”, and some under both. It made finding his tales something of a quest challenge.

If I could have seen the future, back when, I think I would have picked “Lois McMaster” for my writing name, which would have sped up book signings ever after. Too late now.

Oh, one other point I’d like to add about Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen – despite what old Bujold fans, bless them, are saying, you shouldn’t have to read all the other books in the series first to understand this one. I believe it should also work as a stand-alone, a complete tale in itself, although one will certainly get a different reading experience from the text that way. (With luck, it’ll read as a science-fictional examination of the impact new biotechnology can have on the shapes of people’s lives.) The one valid reason not to try it as it stands is if one is actually planning to read the prior books and is very spoiler sensitive.      

What projects and books can we look forward to in the near future by Lois McMaster Bujold?

LMB: Nothing is promised, nothing is in progress, and nothing is ruled out.

As part of my new semi-retirement, I am not only doing less travel and public speaking, I am also not pre-contracting books or stories. No deadlines, no expectations. I am trying very hard not to talk about writing projects, if any, till first drafts are all-the-way bagged. Otherwise, I have discovered, people tend to take anything I say and gallop off in all directions with it, risking artificial disappointment later.

That said, I think doing more short work might be both interesting and freeing. But every story has its own intrinsic demands, including for length, so there is no predicting.

Where can people find your work? (Besides ABSW ;)–though they should totally check here first!)

LMB: All the usual suspects in terms of bookstores and on-line bookstores.   For my e-books, the Baen e-books store, Kindle, iBooks, and Nook. Also, people should not forget their public libraries!

How can we follow your work, share your awesomeness, or otherwise stalk you in a totally non-creepy way?

LMB: A complete list of books may be found here: https://www.goodreads.com/story/show/293438-the-vorkosigan-saga-reading-order-debate-the-chef-recommends

And more information on my books is archived at www.dendarii.com, and I blog at https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16094.Lois_McMaster_Bujold/blog. I post all my publishing news there, and Goodreads features a handy Author Q&A function as well.

If someone wants even more, there is also now this:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/23359569-lois-mcmaster-bujold

and this

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/4033355-the-vorkosigan-companion

As always, thank you very much for your time! We do have Gentleman Jole and the Red Queen in the store for all our Bujold fans.

Posted in author spotlight, Friday, interviews, Spotlight | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Events Buzz: February is Here!

02012016 - Black History month display

Happy February, everyone!

Happy “Black History Month”, as well as a month for “Boosting your Self-Esteem”, and “Teen Dating Violence Awareness.” We’ve already got our children’s display up for Black History, and we’re at 65 James Street are putting out displays and more books for our other themes this week.

We apologize for any inconvenience to anyone who came out to see Liz Mugavero this weekend. She was stricken with a migraine and unable to drive, but we are rescheduling her for Saturday, February 27, from 2:00-4:00, so you still have a chance to see her and have her sign your favorite Pawsitively Organic pet mystery books!

THIS WEEK, we’re gearing up to host the Writers Coffeehouse New England on Saturday, February 6, from 3:00-6:00 PM at the bookstore.

Led by bestselling authors Christopher Golden and James A. Moore, this Q&A Discussion of All Things Writing has moved all around the U.S., and it’s stopping by our little “bigger on the inside” bookstore. Come and ask about anything related to publishing, the writing life, and more—and get answers from people who make a living doing what they love.

We’ll even have coffee and light snacks!

What else is happening in February? Take a look below, and as always, keep an eye on our website and Facebook page (even linked here and at the bottom of the email for your convenience) to check for any changes in our hours or events due to inclement weather.

Tuesday, February 9, 7:00-8:00 PM – Adult Coloring Night

February 15-17, February School Vacation Events

            Monday, February 15, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM – Toddler Singalong.

Monday, February 15, 12:00 – 12:30 PM – Toddler Storytelling

Monday, February 15, 1:00 – 2:00 PM – Kids 4-8 Singalong

Monday, February 15, 2:00 – 2:30 PM – Kids 4-8 Storytelling

Tuesday, February 16, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM – Magical Crafts

Tuesday, February 16, 1:30 – 2:15 PM – Rise of the Guardians Storytelling

Wednesday, February 17, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM – Nature Crafts

Wednesday, February 17, 1:30 – 2:00 PM – Animal Storytime

Wednesday, February 17, 2:00 – 3:00 PM – Crafts / Singalong

Thursday, February 18, 7:00 – 8:00 PM – Doctor Who Talks: Companions, Part One

Saturday, February 20, 2:00-4:00 PM – Sharon Yang presents Bait and Switch

Saturday, February 20, 6:00-8:00 PM – Rainbow Readers

Friday, February 26, 7:00 – 8:30 PM – Worcester Storytellers

RESCHEDULED DATE & TIME: Saturday, February 27, 2:00 – 4:00 PM – Liz Mugavero with her newest Pawsitively Organic pet mystery, Murder Most Finicky

Monday, February 29, 7:00 – 8:00 PM – Free People’s Artists Workshop

For your convenience, here’s a list of our regular events!

Spinning Yarns Craft and Audiobook Social, every Monday 7:00 PM (except for when the Free People’s Artists Workshop meets the last Monday of the month). Bring a craft and enjoy an audiobook or audio drama with other crafty booklovers!

Worcester Storytellers, the fourth Friday of every month from 7-8:30 PM. This month is open mic for all with no featured reader. For the complete updates and schedules, follow Worcester Storytellers on Facebook! Next meeting on February 26.

The Free People’s Artists Workshop, the last Monday of each month from 7:00-9:00 PM. Networking and feedback from other artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association. Next Meeting February 29.

Doctor Who Talks, the third Thursday of every month from 7:00 – 8:00 PM. Join us for a discussion of our favorite science fiction serial. Every month will have a different topic! Next meeting on February 18.

The Rainbow Readers of Massachusetts is an LGBTQA Book club that will meet once a month on Saturdays from 6:00-8:00 PM. The book will be Love Lessons by Heidi Cullinan. Next meeting on February 20.

As always, keep an eye on our website and Facebook page for the most up-to-date information.

May your world be filled with wonderful words!

Posted in events, Monday | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Events Buzz: Looking Toward February

01302016 - Murder Most Finicky

We are rounding out the last week of January and getting ready for February. It is still quite cold outside, and there may still be some snowstorms before winter is over, so make sure you have enough books to cuddle up with this season. Of course, we’re nice and warm inside the bookstore—and we still have our homey little Keurig if you’d like coffee or tea.

On top of that, you’ve even got more time to hang out with us on Sundays as we’ll be closing at 6:00 PM now! In case you need it, here’s a refresher of our hours:

Monday – Thursday: 10:00 AM – 8:00 PM

Friday – Saturday: 10:00 AM – 9:00 PM

Sunday: 10:00 AM – 6:00 PM

We also have quite a few fun events to warm things up, too! As always, keep an eye on our website and Facebook page (even linked here and at the bottom of the email for your convenience) to check for any changes in our hours or events due to inclement weather.

THIS WEEK, TODAY, Monday, January 25 from 7:00-8:00 PM, we are hosting The Free People’s Artists Workshop. Join us for an evening of creating, networking, and getting feedback from local fellow artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association.

And also THIS WEEK, on Saturday, January 30, from 2:00-4:00 PM, we are happy to welcome back Liz Mugavero with her cozy pet mysteries, celebrating her latest release. Murder Most Finicky is the fourth book in Mugavero’s Pawsitively Organic series that follows Kristin “Stan” Connor of Frog Ledge, CT. Her booming Pawsitively Organic pet food has caught the attention of a celebrity pastry chef, who has invited her to a weekend in Newport, RI. The gourmet getaway turns sour, though, when one chef turns up dead and a second one goes missing. The prior series books include, A Biscuit, a Casket; Kneading to Die; and The Icing on the Corpse.

And if the mystery isn’t enough of a hook—Mugavero also serves up some wonderful gourmet pet food recipes! We have all her titles in the store if you want to pick them up before the event

Now… let’s take a look at FEBRUARY!!

Saturday, February 6, 3:00-6:00 PM – Writers Coffeehouse New England.

Led by bestselling authors Christopher Golden and James A. Moore, this Q&A Discussion of All Things Writing has moved all around the U.S., and it’s stopping by our little “bigger on the inside” bookstore. Come and ask about anything related to publishing, the writing life, and more—and get answers from people who make a living doing what they love.

NEW DATE: Tuesday, February 9, 7:00-8:00 PM – Adult Coloring Night

$20 materials fee; pre-registration required. Contact the store in person, by calling 508-796-5613, or email us at info@anniesbooksworcester.com.

UPDATED INFO: February 15-17, Special Vacation Events

            Monday, February 15, 11:00 AM-12:00 PM – Toddler Singalong.

Monday, February 15, 12:00 – 12:30 PM – Toddler Storytelling

Monday, February 15, 1:00 – 2:00 PM – Kids 4-8 Singalong

Monday, February 15, 2:00 – 2:30 PM – Kids 4-8 Storytelling

Tuesday, February 16, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM – Magical Crafts

Tuesday, February 16, 1:30 – 2:15 PM – Rise of the Guardians Storytelling

Wednesday, February 17, 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM – Nature Crafts

Wednesday, February 17, 1:30 – 2:00 PM – Animal Storytime

Wednesday, February 17, 2:00 – 3:00 PM – Crafts / Singalong

NEW LISTING: Thursday, February 18, 7:00 – 8:00 PM – Doctor Who Talks: Companions, Part One

Saturday, February 20, 2:00-4:00 PM – Sharon Yang presents Bait and Switch

Meet author and Worcester State University professor Sharon Yang as she talks about her debut novel, and the love of noir and film that inspired it!

Saturday, February 20, 6:00-8:00 PM – Rainbow Readers

This month’s LGBTQA Book club will read Love Lessons by Heidi Cullinan. Contact the store to reserve your copy today.

Friday, February 26, 7:00 – 8:30 PM – Worcester Storytellers

Monday, February 29, 7:00 – 8:00 PM – Free People’s Artists Workshop

For your convenience, here’s a list of our regular events!

Spinning Yarns Craft and Audiobook Social, every Monday 7:00 PM (except for when the Free People’s Artists Workshop meets the last Monday of the month). Bring a craft and enjoy an audiobook or audio drama with other crafty booklovers!

Worcester Storytellers, the fourth Friday of every month from 7-8:30 PM. For the complete updates and schedules, follow Worcester Storytellers on Facebook! Next meeting on February 26.

The Free People’s Artists Workshop, the last Monday of each month from 7:00-9:00 PM. Networking and feedback from other artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association. MEETS TODAY at 7:00 PM.

Doctor Who Talks, the third Thursday of every month from 7:00 – 8:00 PM. Join us for a discussion of our favorite science fiction serial. Every month will have a different topic! Next meeting on February 18.

The Rainbow Readers of Massachusetts is an LGBTQA Book club that will meet once a month on Saturdays from 6:00-8:00 PM. The February book will be Love Lessons by Heidi Cullinan. Next meeting on February 20.

As always, keep an eye on our website and Facebook page for the most up-to-date information.

May your world be filled with wonderful words!

Posted in events, Monday | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Author Spotlight: Sharon Healy-Yang

01152016 - Yang CoverAnnie’s Book Stop of Worcester is happy to shine a spotlight on professor and author Sharon Healy-Yang! She will be at our little “bigger on the inside” bookstore at 65 James Street on Saturday, February 20, signing and talking about her first published novel, Bait and Switch. Her day job is teaching in the English department at Worcester State, but during her summer and winter breaks, she loves working on fiction. Because she loves classic mysteries of the forties, whether on film or in book, she decided she would enjoy writing her own. She also incorporates her love and knowledge of film and history into her teaching and academic writing, as well.

Welcome to the Spotlight Blog! For readers unfamiliar with your work, how would you describe what you write? What can readers expect from Bait and Switch?

My writing evokes the wit, humor, suspense, and style of 1940s film noir. There are strong and clever women, men who appreciate them, and a wise-aleck cat. My style is very visual, almost cinemagraphic – and I love to keep you guessing. I also like to write about people whom you would probably want to know because of their humor and integrity. That said, they are still human and make mistakes with which most of us can identify.

What kind of research went into writing this book? What is your favorite research story? What cool facts and findings didn’t make it into the book, but you loved discovering?

I went through all different forms of research. When I first started writing it, my parents and other people who’d lived during the time period in which it was set were still alive, so I could pump them for all kinds of info about what it felt like to live during the war or just what life was like at the time. It also helped me have a good feel for the morés of the time, as well as the lingo. Watching old movies also helped me develop my style of expressing ideas, the rhythm of the plot, the way people talked, the way they ate and got around. One of my favorite means of research was sitting in the library and pouring through days and days of the New York Times for the months in which my novel took place. I ended up feeling as if I were really living then: hanging on the latest war news; checking out the advertisements to see what things cost, what stores were open, how people traveled, what shows were playing (on the screen or the stage). Of course there were also some neat books on NYC in the war years, too.

What was the inspiration for Bait and Switch? What were the steps you took to bring it from initial inspiration to the finished book?

I just loved a great mystery and wanted to create my own. Working on this book took years. I refined and revised for a long time, but I became a much better writer because of that. The two sequels moved much faster. But it is hard to write as a teacher, because during the school year I am so fully engaged in my work that I don’t have the creative or intellectual energy to work on fiction. And there’s just not time!

What was the biggest challenge in writing and putting out Bait and Switch? How did you 01152016 - Yang Author picovercome that challenge?

Writing, itself, wasn’t so much of a challenge. Even though, as I said above, teaching doesn’t leave much time or energy for creative work. What killed me was trying to find an agent or a publisher. My 1940s slant wasn’t popular until fairly recently; then, when the era did catch fire, the big publishers and agents were closing down opportunities to new writers. However, I bought my Writers’ Guide to Publishers and to Agents and I blanketed everyone who looked as if he/she might be interested. I happened to hit Touchpoint almost by accident. I had emailed the agent at an agency, even though the web site said they weren’t accepting new authors, because their interests seemed congenial to my work. The agent had actually moved on to start her own press and emailed me back right away expressing her interest. The rest is history. So, finding someone willing to give me a chance and who appreciated my style of writing was the hardest. It required perseverance, cleverness, and luck all together.

What character did you love or hate the most while writing? And why?

This question is hard to answer. I love my main character, Jessica, because a lot of me is in her – except for being willing to risk her life under any circumstances! I like James because he’s a decent guy who respects women. I love Liz, the sister, because she’s smart, has a good heart, and is wonderfully offbeat. I don’t even hate the villains because they were fun to write, though I’ve never been fond of Nazis.

What is your favorite part of being a writer? Of the whole writing and publishing process? What do you think has been your greatest lesson in the journey thus far?

My favorite part? More like favorite parts! I love creating, coming up with a world of people and their environs. I love establishing a mood or turning a clever phrase. I love being able to talk about the writing with others as if the characters are real people. And love the fun of keeping people guessing. I don’t know about the greatest lesson.

What piece of advice would you want to share with other writers?

Advice: Practice! Hone your craft! Get feedback from reliable people: those you respect and those that you believe are representative of your audience. Learn what advice is useful and what isn’t. Don’t be too rigid to accept suggestions, but still figure out which ones will help you achieve what you want to create. Be realistic. Don’t expect the millions to start rolling in. Even if you get published, you’re still probably not going to make much money. Don’t do it for the money; do it because you want to write. That said, still buy my book. Get two; they’re small! Even if you don’t get published or you’re not great, still write. Writing for the pleasure of writing is a wonderful thing.

How important has the New England setting been to your writing?

This novel is not set in New England, but the next two completed ones in the series do draw on parts of New England. In fact one is set almost entirely in coastal Connecticut. The fourth one, in the planning stage, will be set in Maine. I also have rough versions of two other novels, not in the series, set in New England.

I would say New England itself is a wonderful place to live to get in touch with other writers, visit NYC (where this novel is set), have access to independent bookstores, have great settings conducive to sitting down and writing in.

What else can we expect from you in the near future?

I’ll be revising Jessica Minton novel #2 this summer and discussing with my publisher the best time to submit and release it. I’d also like to eventually publish the novels that are outside this series, though this series is my favorite.

What is/are your passions when you’re not writing? How do you make time for your non-writing hobbies/things you love?

My husband and I have lots of fun traveling around the country or in China, England, France, etc. We also love ballroom dancing and riding bicycles on the rail trails. Just walking in nature is fun – and I love to bird watch. We also love to go to concerts and plays. I love Shakespeare, which is one of the courses I teach. I love teaching literature. It’s great to work with students. I’ve developed some really interesting courses like Shakespeare and Film, Film and Lit; Romantic and Victorian Gothic; Creative Thinking/Critical Writing, and Witchcraft in Medieval and Renaissance Literature (team taught). Some other areas of interest are horse racing, my delightful cats, and anything X-Files. In fact, I edited a collection of essays called The X-Files and Literature.

What does your writing space look like? What do you need to have around you while writing or editing?

I like to be someplace comfortable that won’t hurt my back. In the summer, sitting out on our front porch with a view of the hills and an occasional visit from a hummingbird is neat. I always write the first draft in longhand, on paper! It feels more immediate. No keys getting in my way. It’s also easier to cross out but still have the earlier material accessible than using a computer. The computer is nice for revising and composing additional material.

Do you have any favorite foods or drinks that must be in the vicinity (or must be avoided) while you’re writing or editing a piece of work?

Tea! Sometimes coffee.

What is the greatest lesson you’ve learned, thus far, in your writing career?

Not to ever give up and to appreciate the support of friends – and to return that support. I guess that’s three lessons.

Where can people find your work? (Besides ABSW ;)–though they should totally check here first!)

For independent bookstores: Booklover’s Gourmet, Mrs. Bridges Pantry

Toadstools in Peterborough or Keene, NH may be carrying it.

I’m working on A Likely Story, Mystery on Mainstreet, and Tatnuck Booksellers

I’m also available on line through Barnes and Noble.com, Amazon, and Touchpoint Press

How can we follow your work, share your awesomeness, or otherwise stalk you in a totally non-creepy way?

I have a web site that has all the latest on my writing and adventures (riding rail trails and ballroom dancing with my husband, riding herd on two black cats, and going out for tea – as well as my foreign travels). Check out sharonhealyyang.com on WordPress. Please feel free to connect with me there. I’m also on LinkedIn, though that’s more of a professional site. I’ve also set up a listserv, so let me know if you’d like to be on that. Also, the web site has some neat entries on great films, tv shows, and books connected with golden era mysteries. If you’re an educator or student, I also have a page there on teaching and academics.

 

Posted in author spotlight, Friday, Local Authors, Spotlight | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Events Buzz: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

01182016 - Book Snowflakes

Happy Martin Luther King, Jr. Day!

The bookstore is open for our usual hours today, and we are proud of our diverse selection of children’s books here on 65 James Street.

Speaking of children’s books, the American Library Association announced their youth media award winners last week. Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester congratulates all the winners.

The John Newbery Medal for the most outstanding contribution to children’s literature went to Last Stop on Market Street, by Matt de la Peña.

The Randolph Caldecott Medal for the most distinguished American picture book for children went to Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear, illustrated by Sophie Blackall.

The Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award, recognizing an African American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults went to Gone Crazy in Alabama, by Rita Williams-Garcia.

The Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award went to Trombone Shorty, illustrated by Bryan Collier.

The Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Author Award went to Hoodoo, written by Ronald L. Smith.

The Coretta Scott King/John Steptoe New Talent Illustrator Award went to Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement, illustrated by Ekua Holmes.

The Coretta Scott King – Virginia Hamilton Award for Lifetime Achievement went to Jerry Pinkney. The award pays tribute to the quality and magnitude of beloved children’s author Virginia Hamilton.

The Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in literature written for young adults went to Bone Gap, written by Laura Ruby.

The Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience went to Emmanuel’s Dream: The True Story of Emmanuel Ofosu Yeboah, written by Laurie Ann Thompson, illustrated by Sean Qualls for children ages 0 to 10.

Fish in a Tree, written by Lynda Mullaly Hunt and The War that Saved My Life, by Kimberly Brubaker Bradley are the winners of the middle-school (ages 11-13).

The teen (ages 13-18) award winner is The Unlikely Hero of Room 13B, written by Teresa Toten.

Laura Ingalls Wilder Award honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, over a period of years, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children. The 2016 winner is Jerry Pinkney, whose award-winning works include The Lion and the Mouse, recipient of the Caldecott Award in 2010. In addition, Pinkney has received five Caldecott Honor Awards, five Coretta Scott King Illustrator Awards, and four Coretta Scott King Illustrator Honors.

The Margaret A. Edwards Award for lifetime achievement in writing for young adults went to David Levithan. His books include: The Realm of Possibility, Boy Meets Boy, Love is the Higher Law, How They Met, and Other Stories, Wide Awake and Nick and Norah’s Infinite Playlist.

The Pura Belpré (Illustrator) Award honoring a Latino writer and illustrator whose children’s books best portray, affirm and celebrate the Latino cultural experience went to Drum Dream Girl, illustrated by Rafael López.

The Pura Belpré (Author) Award went to Enchanted Air: Two Cultures, Two Wings: A Memoir, written by Margarita Engle.

The Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Award for most distinguished informational book for children went to Funny Bones: Posada and His Day of the Dead Calaveras, written and illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh.

The Stonewall Book Award – Mike Morgan & Larry Romans Children’s & Young Adult Literature Award given annually to English-language children’s and young adult books of exceptional merit relating to the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender experience went to George, written by Alex.

The Theodor Seuss Geisel Award for the most distinguished beginning reader book went to Don’t Throw It to Mo! written by David A. Adler and illustrated by Sam Ricks.

The William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens went to Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda, written by Becky Albertalli.

The YALSA Award for Excellence in Nonfiction for Young Adults went to Most Dangerous: Daniel Ellsberg and the Secret History of the Vietnam War, written by Steve Sheinkin.

For the full list of winners and honorees, visit the ALA announcement here.

Now, onto events and activities!! As always, keep an eye on our website and Facebook page (even linked here and at the bottom of the email for your convenience) to check for any changes in our hours or events due to inclement weather.

THIS WEEK, on Thursday, January 21, from 7:00-8:00 PM, we continue with our regular Doctor Who Talk series with this month’s focus on Planets. Join us for a discussion about the different planets the Doctor has visited, saved…or possibly destroyed. Remember, sweetie, no spoilers from this season!

Then on Friday, January 22, from 7:00-8:30 PM, we welcome Worcester Storytellers back for their regular open mic event with a featured reader Jenith Charpentier.

For the rest of the month and onward, here is the updated events information. With weather in particular, these things can get changed or postponed, so keep an eye on our Facebook page in case of any last-minute notes.

Monday, January 25, 7:00-8:00 PM – The Free People’s Artists Workshop.

Join us for an evening of creating, networking, and getting feedback from local fellow artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association.

UPDATED: Saturday, January 30, 2:00-4:00 PM – Cozy Cat Mysteries with Liz Mugavero

We already have copies in of her latest Pawsitively Organic Mystery release, Murder Most Finicky, and if you’d like to stock up on Liz’s other titles before the event, we have them all in stock.

Now… let’s take a look at FEBRUARY!!

NEW EVENT: Saturday, February 6, 3:00-6:00 PM – Writers Coffeehouse New England.

Led by bestselling authors Christopher Golden and James A. Moore, this Q&A Discussion of All Things Writing has moved all around the U.S., and it’s stopping by our little “bigger on the inside” bookstore. Come and ask about anything related to publishing, the writing life, and more—and get answers from people who make a living doing what they love.

NEW EVENT: Saturday, February 20, 2:00-4:00 PM – Sharon Yang presents Bait and Switch

Meet author and Worcester State University professor Sharon Yang as she talks about her debut novel, and the love of noir and film that inspired it!

As we move into a new year, we’re still continuing our regular events!

Spinning Yarns Craft and Audiobook Social, every Monday 7:00 PM (except for when the Free People’s Artists Workshop meets the last Monday of the month). Bring a craft and enjoy an audiobook or audio drama with other crafty booklovers!

Worcester Storytellers, the fourth Friday of every month from 7-8:30 PM. For the complete updates and schedules, follow Worcester Storytellers on Facebook! Next meeting on January 22.

The Free People’s Artists Workshop, the last Monday of each month from 7:00-9:00 PM. Networking and feedback from other artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association.

Doctor Who Talks, the third Thursday of every month from 7:00 – 8:00 PM. Join us for a discussion of our favorite science fiction serial. Every month will have a different topic! Next meeting on January 21.

The Rainbow Readers of Massachusetts is an LGBTQA Book club that will meet once a month on Saturdays from 6:00-8:00 PM. Next meeting on January 16.

As always, keep an eye on our website and Facebook page for the most up-to-date information.

May your world be filled with wonderful words!

Posted in events, Monday | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Events Buzz Monday: Calendar CreativityWe’re beginning the second full week of the new year, and we’re already planning ahead! Besides scheduling and promoting events (we’re booking for February and March!), we’re also having fun with the 2016 Chase’s Calendar of Events, which is “the most comprehensive and authoritative reference available on special events, holidays, federal and state observances, historic anniversaries, astronomical phenomena, and more.” We’ll be pulling out some lesser-known and esoteric themes to celebrate each month. Besides displays for “Black History Month” in February (particularly in our children’s room), we’ll have displays and other surprises for the themes of “Boosting your Self-Esteem” and “Teen Dating Violence Awareness.” We’re also working on activities for February School Vacation Week (February 15-19). Some of the activities will require or strongly urge pre-registration. Others may include glitter—for which one can never have enough early warning. Either way, keep an eye on our pages! Also with winter here, we may as well repeat that you should keep an eye on our website and Facebook page (even linked here and at the bottom of the email for your convenience) to check for any changes in our hours or events due to inclement weather. It is New England after all; what’s our weather if not chaotic? We still have available copies of How to be a Normal Person by TJ Klune for THIS SATURDAY’s, January 16, Rainbow Readers of Massachusetts LGBTQA Book Club meeting. Want to know more? Here’s the book blurb: Gustavo Tiberius is not normal. He knows this. Everyone in his small town of Abby, Oregon, knows this. He reads encyclopedias every night before bed. He has a pet ferret called Harry S. Truman. He owns a video rental store that no one goes to. His closest friends are a lady named Lottie with drag queen hair and a trio of elderly Vespa riders known as the We Three Queens. Gus is not normal. And he’s fine with that. All he wants is to be left alone. Until Casey, an asexual stoner hipster and the newest employee at Lottie’s Lattes, enters his life. For some reason, Casey thinks Gus is the greatest thing ever. And maybe Gus is starting to think the same thing about Casey, even if Casey is obsessive about Instagramming his food. But Gus isn’t normal and Casey deserves someone who can be. Suddenly wanting to be that someone, Gus steps out of his comfort zone and plans to become the most normal person ever. After all, what could possibly go wrong? Even if you haven’t had a chance to read the book, come and join us for a great discussion about GLBTQA topics and fiction! And NEXT WEEK, on Thursday, January 21, from 7:00-8:00 PM, we continue with our regular Doctor Who Talk series with this month’s focus on Planets. Join us for a discussion about the different planets the Doctor has visited, saved…or possibly destroyed. Remember, sweetie, no spoilers from this season! Then on Friday, January 22, from 7:00-8:30 PM, we welcome Worcester Storytellers back for their regular open mic event with a featured reader—stay tuned to find out who! For the rest of the month and onward, here is the updated events information. With weather in particular, these things can get changed or postponed, so keep an eye on our Facebook page in case of any last-minute notes. UPDATED: MOVING TO SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2:00-4:00 PM – Author Sharon Legasey presents The House of Wonder. Local author and teacher Sharon Legasey shares her historical adventure children’s book. Monday, January 26, 7:00 PM – The Free People’s Artists Workshop. UPDATED: MOVING TO THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 7:00 PM – Adult Coloring Night Pre-registration is required. There will be a $20 materials fee, and anyone who pre-registers gets a discounted price on our adult coloring book selections. Monday, January 25, 7:00-8:00 PM – The Free People’s Artists Workshop. Join us for an evening of creating, networking, and getting feedback from local fellow artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association. Saturday, January 30, 2:00-4:00 PM – Cozy Cat Mysteries with Liz Mugavero We already have copies in of her latest Pawsitively Organic Mystery release, Murder Most Finicky, and we have her other books on order. Stop in to reserve your copy today! As we move into a new year, we’re still continuing our regular events! Spinning Yarns Craft and Audiobook Social, every Monday 7:00 PM (except for when the Free People’s Artists Workshop meets the last Monday of the month). Bring a craft and enjoy an audiobook or audio drama with other crafty booklovers! Worcester Storytellers, the fourth Friday of every month from 7-8:30 PM. For the complete updates and schedules, follow Worcester Storytellers on Facebook! Next meeting on January 22. The Free People’s Artists Workshop, the last Monday of each month from 7:00-9:00 PM. Networking and feedback from other artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association. Doctor Who Talks, the third Thursday of every month from 7:00 – 8:00 PM. Join us for a discussion of our favorite science fiction serial. Every month will have a different topic! Next meeting on January 21. The Rainbow Readers of Massachusetts is an LGBTQA Book club that will meet once a month on Saturdays from 6:00-8:00 PM. Next meeting on January 16. As always, keep an eye on our website and Facebook page for the most up-to-date information. May your world be filled with wonderful words!

01112016 - Chase Calendar Pic

We’re beginning the second full week of the new year, and we’re already planning ahead! Besides scheduling and promoting events (we’re booking for February and March!), we’re also having fun with the 2016 Chase’s Calendar of Events, which is “the most comprehensive and authoritative reference available on special events, holidays, federal and state observances, historic anniversaries, astronomical phenomena, and more.” We’ll be pulling out some lesser-known and esoteric themes to celebrate each month. Besides displays for “Black History Month” in February (particularly in our children’s room), we’ll have displays and other surprises for the themes of “Boosting your Self-Esteem” and “Teen Dating Violence Awareness.”

We’re also working on activities for February School Vacation Week (February 15-19). Some of the activities will require or strongly urge pre-registration. Others may include glitter—for which one can never have enough early warning. Either way, keep an eye on our pages!

Also with winter here, we may as well repeat that you should keep an eye on our website and Facebook page (even linked here and at the bottom of the email for your convenience) to check for any changes in our hours or events due to inclement weather. It is New England after all; what’s our weather if not chaotic?

We still have available copies of How to be a Normal Person by TJ Klune for THIS SATURDAY’s, January 16, Rainbow Readers of Massachusetts LGBTQA Book Club meeting. Want to know more? Here’s the book blurb:

Gustavo Tiberius is not normal. He knows this. Everyone in his small town of Abby, Oregon, knows this. He reads encyclopedias every night before bed. He has a pet ferret called Harry S. Truman. He owns a video rental store that no one goes to. His closest friends are a lady named Lottie with drag queen hair and a trio of elderly Vespa riders known as the We Three Queens.

Gus is not normal. And he’s fine with that. All he wants is to be left alone.

Until Casey, an asexual stoner hipster and the newest employee at Lottie’s Lattes, enters his life. For some reason, Casey thinks Gus is the greatest thing ever. And maybe Gus is starting to think the same thing about Casey, even if Casey is obsessive about Instagramming his food.

But Gus isn’t normal and Casey deserves someone who can be. Suddenly wanting to be that someone, Gus steps out of his comfort zone and plans to become the most normal person ever.

After all, what could possibly go wrong?

Even if you haven’t had a chance to read the book, come and join us for a great discussion about GLBTQA topics and fiction!

And NEXT WEEK, on Thursday, January 21, from 7:00-8:00 PM, we continue with our regular Doctor Who Talk series with this month’s focus on Planets. Join us for a discussion about the different planets the Doctor has visited, saved…or possibly destroyed. Remember, sweetie, no spoilers from this season!

Then on Friday, January 22, from 7:00-8:30 PM, we welcome Worcester Storytellers back for their regular open mic event with a featured reader—stay tuned to find out who!

For the rest of the month and onward, here is the updated events information. With weather in particular, these things can get changed or postponed, so keep an eye on our Facebook page in case of any last-minute notes.

UPDATED: MOVING TO SUNDAY, MARCH 6, 2:00-4:00 PM – Author Sharon Legasey presents The House of Wonder.

Local author and teacher Sharon Legasey shares her historical adventure children’s book.

Monday, January 26, 7:00 PM – The Free People’s Artists Workshop.

UPDATED: MOVING TO THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 7:00 PM – Adult Coloring Night

Pre-registration is required. There will be a $20 materials fee, and anyone who pre-registers gets a discounted price on our adult coloring book selections.

Monday, January 25, 7:00-8:00 PM – The Free People’s Artists Workshop.

Join us for an evening of creating, networking, and getting feedback from local fellow artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association.

Saturday, January 30, 2:00-4:00 PM – Cozy Cat Mysteries with Liz Mugavero

We already have copies in of her latest Pawsitively Organic Mystery release, Murder Most Finicky, and we have her other books on order. Stop in to reserve your copy today!

As we move into a new year, we’re still continuing our regular events!

Spinning Yarns Craft and Audiobook Social, every Monday 7:00 PM (except for when the Free People’s Artists Workshop meets the last Monday of the month). Bring a craft and enjoy an audiobook or audio drama with other crafty booklovers!

Worcester Storytellers, the fourth Friday of every month from 7-8:30 PM. For the complete updates and schedules, follow Worcester Storytellers on Facebook! Next meeting on January 22.

The Free People’s Artists Workshop, the last Monday of each month from 7:00-9:00 PM. Networking and feedback from other artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association.

Doctor Who Talks, the third Thursday of every month from 7:00 – 8:00 PM. Join us for a discussion of our favorite science fiction serial. Every month will have a different topic! Next meeting on January 21.

The Rainbow Readers of Massachusetts is an LGBTQA Book club that will meet once a month on Saturdays from 6:00-8:00 PM. Next meeting on January 16.

As always, keep an eye on our website and Facebook page for the most up-to-date information.

May your world be filled with wonderful words!

Posted in events, Monday | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Author Spotlight: Cecilia Tan

01082016 - Magic University coversAward-winning author Cecilia Tan visited ABSW back in December and gave a wonderful talk about the state of the publishing industry for erotica and erotic romance. She’s been actively publishing erotic stories for over 20 years and is the owner of science fiction erotica publishing house, Circlet Press. We’re happy to now shine our Author Spotlight on her with this great interview!

Thank you, again, for visiting our store and your talk, Cecilia, as well as letting us interview you. For those who missed the talk or are less familiar with your work, can you please tell us briefly a little about yourself and your writing?

I started writing when I was a child, but when I got out of college in 1989, the first story I wrote that felt fully formed was an erotic science fiction story called “Telepaths Don’t Need Safewords.” That put me right at the intersection of romance, BDSM, erotica, and sf/fantasy and that’s pretty much where I still am today, twenty years and over a dozen novels, 100+ short stories, and a pile of awards nominations later.

How would you describe what you write? What can readers expect from your latest publications?

The fun of living in a post-50-Shades world is now I can incorporate more BDSM into my romances. TAKING THE LEAD is coming out officially in January so you should see it hitting stores soon. In it I get to combine two of my favorite things: BDSM and rock stars! I’ve wanted to write a “bad boy” romance for a while now and with this one I finally get my chance. I have a rock star hero who has very kinky tastes and I have a Hollywood heiress who catches his eye. Sparks fly, hijinks ensue!

01082016 - Taking the Lead cover

While folks are waiting for that one, though, I’m so happy my Magic University books are finally all in matching paperbacks. The series is kind of an erotic take on Harry Potter (it’s about the secret magical departments at Harvard, including sex magic, of course…) and back in 2010 it was supposed to be published in paperback by Red Wheel Weiser, but after the first two books appeared, they folded their fiction imprint. So now all the books are finally available in beautiful editions!

What kind of research went into writing Magic University? What is your favorite research story? What cool facts and findings didn’t make it into the book, but you loved discovering?

Because Magic University is set in the “real” world, I was constantly going down the rabbit hole of researching real-world spiritual and magical traditions, from Greek myths to Zoroastrian prophecies to Bible stories. The Old Testament is constantly mentioning magicians, for example: it was my job to tease out which of these stories would turn out to be “true” from the point of view of my magical society and which were “just” myths. I probably read five or six different books about Tarot just because I enjoyed reading about Tarot cards so much.

 

I especially had fun compiling lists of real and mythical people who were witches or wizards. Of course you had people like Circe or Merlin, but in my system poetry was a kind of magic. So Shakespeare and Shelley and Blake were all wizards, as far as I’m concerned, and especially the Harvard-educated like T.S. Eliot and New England poets like Emerson and Robert Frost.

What was the inspiration for TAKING THE LEAD? What were the steps you took to bring it from initial inspiration to the finished book?

My editor in New York wanted more BDSM romance after the awards that my book SLOW SURRENDER won, but we didn’t want to do another book that was in the 50-Shades vein of “he’s a billionaire, she’s not.” So my brain just went to: what if SHE is the billionaire? Our heroine has the money and prestige this time, so what kind of hero is going to really turn her world upside down? I immediately thought a kinky rock star “bad boy” would do it, and boy, does he. Once I knew who Ricki and Axel were, the book just spooled out like a dream. The plot took a couple of twists and turns but fortunately my editor liked the turns that it took. I won’t give away the story but suffice to say our couple gets themselves into some very emotional and erotic situations.

How important has the New England setting been to your writing?

With the Magic University series it was really important. Not only are the books set at Harvard, so I got to incorporate a lot of cool Harvard and Cambridge city history, I got to use a lot of settings right in my own neighborhood. And the weather. Our crazy New England weather ends up playing an important part in the books, from thunderstorms to snow to hurricanes. (As well as beautiful autumn days… it’s not all bad!)

What does your writing space look like? What do you need to have around you while writing or editing?

My writing space looks like: wherever I am at the moment. I’ve trained myself away from the idea that you “need” to have a certain kind of environment for top productivity. TAKING THE LEAD was written on planes, on trains, in buses, at airport gates, in hotel lobbies, in my parents’ living room in the middle of the night, in an Epcot cafeteria at Disney (not kidding), in coffee shops, and in every room in my house including the bathroom. If I had to have the right music, the right snacks, the right time of day, etc. I’d never get anything written. That said, I do like to have a nice pot (or Thermos) of tea beside me, whether I’m at home or in a coffee shop or on a plane!

Where can people find your work? (Besides ABSW ;)–though they should totally check here first!)

All over the place! My mainstream books of course are in bookstores, while the indie and small press books can be requested or mail ordered, and the ebooks and online serials can only be found online. My publishers include Hachette, Tor Books, Riverdale Avenue Books, and Circlet Press, among others, so it’s not a simple answer. :-) There’s a great online tool for finding independent bookstores near you who might have the work of an author: check out the new search function of IndieBound:

http://www.indiebound.org/search/book?searchfor=Tan%2C+Cecilia

01082016 - Cecilia Tan head

How can we follow your work, share your awesomeness, or otherwise stalk you in a totally non-creepy way?

I send a monthly newsletter in email that catches everyone up on all my writing and exciting travel and news that anyone can sign up to be on here: http://bit.ly/ctannews

And then there’s always social media…

Personal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cecilia.tan

Twitter: https://twitter.com/ceciliatan

Website: http://blog.ceciliatan.com

Instagram: https://instagram.com/ctan_writer/

Tumblr: https://www.tumblr.com/blog/ceciliatan

g+: https://plus.google.com/+CeciliaTan/posts

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/ctanwriter/

YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/ctanvideo/featured

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/65430.Cecilia_Tan

Wattpad: http://www.wattpad.com/user/ceciliatan

 

Posted in author spotlight, Friday, Local Authors, Spotlight | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment