Author Spotlight – James Rousmaniere

Jim Pic

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is happy to shine our Friday spotlight on James Rousmaniere, author of The Water Connections: What Fresh Water Means to Us, What We Mean to Water , a non-fiction book about our changing ways around fresh water. James will be at Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester on Saturday, March 7th at 2:00 PM to sign and read from his book, and answer any questions people may have on this extremely important subject.

I asked James if he could please tell us briefly a little about himself and his writing:

Before taking up a study of fresh water I was in daily journalism for 43 years, including service as an economics correspondent in Washington for The Baltimore Sun and later as editor of The Keene (NH) Sentinel. I am active in community affairs in southwestern New Hampshire. I have been fortunate to have been able to travel widely internationally – as a student, as a Peace Corps volunteer (India), as a news media consultant and as an adventurer. I am married and have three daughters and one granddaughter.

Where can people find your work? (Besides Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester –though they should totally check here first!)

Bauhan Publishing in Peterborough, NH and also other bookstores in New England

How can we follow your work and share your awesomeness?  

 You can follow my work about water, including a blog on the subject, at

https://www.waterconnections.net/

What was the inspiration for Water Connections? What were the steps you took to bring it from initial inspiration to the finished book?

In 2012 my tiny town of Roxbury NH celebrated its bicentennial. I organized a commemorative booklet and assigned myself a short article about the waters in town that included two reservoirs for a neighboring city and a federal flood control dam; my article was about how the watershed protections around those water bodies assured that much of the town would forever be very green. Later, while relaxing by a stream that connected the two reservoirs, I wondered, if water can influence the character of a community by keeping it green, how else might water have an impact on society? That led to a book that takes up water power, water contamination, floods and flood control, citizen action around water, and so on.

Water Connections pic

 

What is your favorite part of being a writer?  Of the whole writing and publishing process?  What do you think has been your greatest lesson in the journey thus far?

The research part, where one is constantly learning and making discoveries. It’s the journalist’s life that I like.

What piece of advice would you want to share with other writers?

Don’t let cleverness of expression get in the way of what you want to say.

How important has the New England setting been to your writing?

Water Connections takes the reader to other parts of the country and other parts of the world, but the book is largely set in New England, a region that’s distinctive for its development history, its topography and its rainfall patterns. I imagine that a book about inland waters in, say, the arid Southwest, would be a different book, as would one that focused principally on the Northwest.

What else can we expect from you in the near future?

 I am considering a couple of book possibilities in the non-fiction category that, much like Water Connections show how things come about – essentially, how history happens.

What do you consider the most challenging part of the writing process? And how do you overcome that?

Following a four decades-long career in daily journalism, in which expression is pretty direct and the author is absent from the narrative, I had to learn a new language that (a) was more conversational and (b) enabled personal reflection.  I met the challenge by not trying to force a change, but rather let the change gradually happen as I researched and wrote.

What is the greatest lesson you’ve learned, thus far, in your writing career?

Fluency with the language is only part of the deal; ideas are important, meaning one must have something to say.

Thanks so much for answering our questions for us, James. We look forward to seeing you at Annie’s for a book signing on Saturday, March 7th at 2:00 PM.

Posted in author spotlight, events, Friday, Local Authors, Spotlight | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Speculative Fiction Tuesday: Two Sides of A Mirror?

The newest issue of DOCTOR WHO MONTHLY has hit our display racks, and it has two covers to choose from.

The Jodie Whittaker cover has The Thirteenth Doctor in fully serious mode…

dwm548_doctor

… while the cover with Sacha Dhawan shows The Master as both sinister and reflective.

dwm548_master

Series 12 has had its share of twists and turns, and you can get a sneak preview into the season’s final episodes when you purchase the latest issue.

Don’t forget that we also offer a mail order subscription service for DOCTOR WHO MONTHLY, as well as a pull and hold service.  Six-month and twelve-month prepaid subscriptions are available.  Please stop by the store or call us at 508-796-5613 for more information.

Our Doctor Who Monthly Meetup is this Sunday, February 23rd, starting at 2PM.  Please join us in Time and Space.

Posted in doctor who magazine, events, mail order service, Speculative Fiction, Tuesday | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Events Buzz Monday: Confusing Weather, Convention Fun, And School Vacation Week!

spring-equinox-ten-things

We are counting down the days until the vernal equinox with nary a blizzard in sight – sssshhhhh! don’t jinx it!  While there are still a few weeks to go, we are already seeing the daylight getting longer and the evenings shorter.  We’re expecting some messy weather this week, which does lend itself to curling up with a good book.

This past weekend, some of our staff traveled in to Boston to attend Boskone 57, one of the longest-running conventions specializing in science fiction and fantasy in many forms.  We came back with copious notes and long lists of authors whose works we will be stocking… keep an eye on our Events Calendar for appearances and our Friday spotlight for interviews.

Here’s our schedule for upcoming events… As a reminder, the majority of our events here at ABSW are free and open to the public. Check out our page on SocialWeb.net!  


RECURRING EVENT: TONIGHTMonday, February 17  at 7PM – Spinning Yarns Craft and Audiobook Social! Bring a craft and enjoy an audiobook or audio drama with other crafty booklovers!

SPECIAL EVENT: Tuesday, February 18, 11AM–2PM – Rainbow Fish Drop-In Crafts & Activities  Join us for aquatic-themed crafts for ages four and up! Pre-registration suggested so that we can be assured of having enough supplies for everyone. Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times.

RECURRING EVENT: TOMORROWTuesday, February 18 at 7PM – Game Night! Join us weekly on Tuesday nights starting at 7PM for card games, board games and more. Best score of the night wins a $10.00 gift certificate!

SPECIAL EVENT: Saturday, February 22 at 1PM – Riverdale – For High Schoolers Only  Join us for a talk about Riverdale. Are some of the problems that the people in Riverdale have similar to those that high school students now really face or is it ALL just hype? Ages 13 and up! Pre-registration suggested. Call (508)796-5613.

SPECIAL EVENT: Saturday, February 22 at 6PM – Rainbow Readers Discusses SWORD DANCE by A.J. Demas. The Rainbow Readers of Massachusetts is an LGBTQIA book club that meets once a month. All are welcome!

RECURRING EVENT: Sunday, February 23, 2PM-3PM – Doctor Who Monthly Meetup! Join us for a monthly meeting of fans as we talk about the world’s longest-running science fiction series and its classic and modern incarnations – television, novels, audios, comics, and more. This is a kid-friendly and adult-friendly gathering; all are welcome.

RECURRING EVENT: Monday, February 24, 7PM-9PM – The Free People’s Artists Workshop! This critique group meets on the fourth Monday of each month. Networking and feedback from other artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association.

RECURRING EVENT:  Tuesday, February 25 at 7PM – Game Night! Join us weekly on Tuesday nights starting at 7PM for card games, board games and more. Best score of the night wins a $10.00 gift certificate!

And we’re planning fun in March… keep an eye out for postings about our Doctor Seuss day, as well as events with scientist James Rousmaniere, picture book author Sharon Legasey, poet Chris Reilley, a panel with three middle grade authors, and more!

Exciting things are happening at our little bookstore that’s bigger on the inside… more opportunities to serve the Worcester community… more book talks, more author signings, and more workshops.  Keep an eye on the Events Calendar on our website for more details.

May your world be filled with wonderful words!

Posted in Announcements, events, Hello from Annie's, Monday, weekend roundup | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Author Spotlight Friday – Ann Cleeves

Ann Cleeves_Credit David Hurst

Photo Credit: David Hirst

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is happy to shine our Friday spotlight on Mystery Writer Ann Cleeves. Ann is the author of over thirty critically acclaimed novels, and in 2017 was awarded the highest accolade in crime writing, the CWA Diamond Dagger. She is the creator of popular detectives Vera Stanhope and Jimmy Perez who can now be found on television in ITV’s Vera and BBC One’s Shetland. The TV series and the books they are based on have become international sensations, capturing the minds of millions worldwide.

Ann worked as a probation officer, bird observatory cook, and auxiliary coastguard before she started writing. She is a member of ‘Murder Squad’, working with other British northern writers to promote crime fiction. Ann is also a passionate champion for libraries and was a National Libraries Day Ambassador in 2016. Ann lives in North Tyneside, UK near where the Vera books are set.

First question: Where can people find your work? (Besides Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester –though they should totally check here first!)

My books can be found wherever books are sold!

How can we follow your work and share your awesomeness?

http://www.anncleeves.com/

https://www.facebook.com/anncleeves/

https://twitter.com/AnnCleeves

For readers unfamiliar with your work, how would you describe what you write?  What can readers expect from The Long Call?

I write traditional British murder mysteries but with a contemporary twist.  Place is most important to me; I believe that characters and stories grow out of the landscapes and communities where they live.  One of my series, featuring detective Vera Stanhope, is set in Northumberland, where I’ve made my home.  This is the least populated county in England and I can’t imagine Vera having grown up away from here.  Another is set in Shetland, the most northerly place in the UK, a group of bleak and bare islands with a tiny population.  The Long Call, my most recent novel, takes me back to the North Devon of my childhood.  The novel introduces Inspector Matthew Venn, who’s returning home too.  He grew up in a strict evangelical sect and his first investigation forces him to confront this uncomfortable past.

What kind of research went into writing this book?  What is your favorite research story? What cool facts and findings didn’t make it into the book, but you loved discovering?

I don’t do a lot of research; I’m very lazy and I love writing fiction because I can make so much up.  I find facts hard and unforgiving things. The research for The Long Call was fun though.  It involved me staying with an old schoolfriend who still lives in North Devon, walking on the beaches where we’d had parties as teenagers, reliving my very happy childhood.  One of the characters in The Long Call is a woman who has Down’s Syndrome.  My friend had worked for most of her career with adults with learning disabilities so she was very helpful, but it still seemed important to speak to someone with Down’s.  I had a great afternoon chatting to a young woman called Issy and her mum.  Issy is immensely confident and very independent and I hope I’ve done her justice in the book.

I’m also lucky to have friends who work within the criminal justice system – a forensic pathologist, a forensic soil scientist and a crime scene manager – so they’re useful when it comes to research too.

The Long Call Cover

What character did you love or hate the most while writing? And why?

There’s a character in The Long Call named Jen Rafferty.  She’s Matthew Venn’s sergeant, and couldn’t be more different from him if she tried.  She’s a woman who married too early and had her children when she was too young.  The marriage was a disaster, and now she’s single and approaching middle-age.  Her kids are becoming independent and she’s trying to experience the life she’s missed out on.  She parties hard and is desperate to find a man.  She’s also an empathetic and intuitive detective.

What draws you to the particular genre or style that you write? What do you think draws readers to these kinds of books?

I’ve always enjoyed reading crime fiction.  When I was younger, I read everything I could lay my hands on, but if I was miserable – if I was ill or had been dumped by a boyfriend – crime was always my comfort reading.  There was something reassuring about a book with a resolution, and a mystery, and characters I could get to know across a series of novels.  There’s a terrific range of crime novels now, from plot-driven thrillers to complex psychological dramas.  My own favourites are books in translation.  I think we can learn so much about a culture’s preoccupations by reading its popular fiction.  As a writer, I find the structure of the traditional mystery very useful.  I don’t enjoy plotting and the established framework allows me to concentrate on creating characters, families and communities, exploring what keeps them together and what makes them fall apart.

What is your favorite part of being a writer?  Of the whole writing and publishing process?  What do you think has been your greatest lesson in the journey thus far?

My favourite part of being a writer is telling the story, sitting at the kitchen table early in the morning, usually in my pyjamas and spinning a tale.  My greatest lesson?  Realizing that much of my success is down to luck, and making sure I don’t take myself too seriously.

Ann, thanks so much for taking the time out of your very busy writing schedule to answer our questions!

Posted in author spotlight, Friday, interviews, Spotlight | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Events Buzz Monday: Yarn, Dice, Dragons, Fish, and Eternal Teenagers!

We’re all cozy here in our little bookstore that’s bigger on the inside, despite the gray skies and damp weather expected for the remainder of the week.  Come on in for a complementary cup of coffee, tea or cocoa; we’ve gotten numerous new titles in, as well as making fresh displays to appeal to every bibliophiliac taste.  As we like to say, “Books Are Love”, and with Valentine’s Day coming up, we’ve got lots to choose from to purchase for those you love… especially YOU!

booksarelove

Here’s our schedule for upcoming events… As a reminder, the majority of our events here at ABSW are free and open to the public. Check out our page on SocialWeb.net!  


RECURRING EVENT: TONIGHTMonday, February 10  at 7PM – Spinning Yarns Craft and Audiobook Social! Bring a craft and enjoy an audiobook or audio drama with other crafty booklovers!

rainbowsnowcone

RECURRING EVENT: TOMORROWTuesday, February 11 at 7PM – Game Night! Join us weekly on Tuesday nights starting at 7PM for card games, board games and more. Best score of the night wins a $10.00 gift certificate!

Joker Background Illustration

SPECIAL EVENT: Monday, February 17, 11AM–2PM – Dragons! Drop-in Crafts and Activities  For the first day of February School Vacation Week, join us for animal-themed crafts for ages four and up! Pre-registration suggested so that we can be assured of having enough supplies for everyone. Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times. Call us at 508-796-5613.

custard1

RECURRING EVENT:  Monday, February 17 at 7PM – Spinning Yarns Craft and Audiobook Social! Bring a craft and enjoy an audiobook or audio drama with other crafty booklovers!

SPECIAL EVENT: Tuesday, February 18, 11AM–2PM – Rainbow Fish Drop-In Crafts & Activities  Join us for animal-themed crafts for ages four and up! Pre-registration suggested so that we can be assured of having enough supplies for everyone. Children must be accompanied by an adult at all times.

rainbowfish

RECURRING EVENT:  Tuesday, February 18 at 7PM – Game Night! Join us weekly on Tuesday nights starting at 7PM for card games, board games and more. Best score of the night wins a $10.00 gift certificate!

SPECIAL EVENT: Saturday, February 22 at 1PM – Riverdale – For High Schoolers Only  Join us for a talk about Riverdale. Are some of the problems that the people in Riverdale have similar to those that high school students now really face or is it ALL just hype? Ages 13 and up! Pre-registration suggested. Call (508)796-5613.

riverdale

SPECIAL EVENT: Saturday, February 22 at 6PM – Rainbow Readers Discusses SWORD DANCE by A.J. Demas. The Rainbow Readers of Massachusetts is an LGBTQIA book club that meets once a month. All are welcome!

RECURRING EVENT: Sunday, February 23, 2PM-3PM – Doctor Who Monthly Meetup! Join us for a monthly meeting of fans as we talk about the world’s longest-running science fiction series and its classic and modern incarnations – television, novels, audios, comics, and more. This is a kid-friendly and adult-friendly gathering; all are welcome.

RECURRING EVENT: Monday, February 24, 7PM-9PM – The Free People’s Artists Workshop! This critique group meets on the fourth Monday of each month. Networking and feedback from other artists and creators of all types. Co-sponsored by the Worcester County Poetry Association.

RECURRING EVENT:  Tuesday, February 25 at 7PM – Game Night! Join us weekly on Tuesday nights starting at 7PM for card games, board games and more. Best score of the night wins a $10.00 gift certificate!

And we’re planning fun in March… keep an eye out for postings about our Doctor Seuss day, as well as events with scientist James Rousmaniere, picture book author Sharon Legasey, poet Chris Reilley, a panel with three middle grade authors, and more!

Exciting things are happening at our little bookstore that’s bigger on the inside… more opportunities to serve the Worcester community… more book talks, more author signings, and more workshops.  Keep an eye on the Events Calendar on our website for more details.

May your world be filled with wonderful words!

Posted in Announcements, crafts, events, gifts, Hello from Annie's, Monday | Tagged | Leave a comment

Author Spotlight -Luanne Rice

Luanne Rice Pic

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is happy to shine our Friday spotlight on Luanne Rice, the bestselling author of 34 novels and more, most of which center on love, family, nature, and the sea. I asked her to tell us a bit about herself and her writing, and this was her response:

I have always written.  My first publication was a poem in the Hartford Courant when I was eleven.  Magically it appeared in the paper one day—I thought that one simply wrote and her work appeared in print, until I found out my mother had submitted it.  My first novel was ANGELS ALL OVER TOWN, and my most recent is LAST DAY.  In between there were lots more novels, including three YA’s, short stories, and essays.  I feel so lucky to have been able to do what I love—write—my entire life.

Where can people find your work? (Besides Tower Books –though they should totally check here first!)

Find me wherever you love to buy books!

How can we follow your work and share your awesomeness?

I would be so thrilled to have you follow me on Twitter and Instagram (@LuanneRice), and Facebook.  I also post blogs and news on my website, www.luannerice.com.

For readers unfamiliar with your work, how would you describe what you write?  What can readers expect from The Last Day?

I write about families, often sisters, and the secrets within our houses.  Even the most “normal” families—the people next door—have extraordinary lives, sometimes darkness hidden behind happy-appearing façades.  That’s the case in LAST DAY, my most recent book.  It is inspired by a real-life murder that affected my family.  My writing is set in New England, most often on the Connecticut Shoreline.

What kind of research went into writing this book?  What is your favorite research story? What cool facts and findings didn’t make it into the book, but you loved discovering?

Because Last Day is so close to my heart, the story flowed easily.  But I needed to research police investigations, forensic science, sailing in the open ocean, and American Impressionism.  I spoke to a special agent in the FBI, homicide detectives, a Connecticut state trooper, and an expert in forensic biology.  I studied history of art in college, and I live in Old Lyme, Connecticut—the birthplace of American Impressionism—and was lucky enough to be able to visit the Florence Griswold Museum and speak to a gallery owner—to know more about that aspect of the book.

What was the inspiration for Last Day? What were the steps you took to bring it from initial inspiration to the finished book?

Years ago I wrote a magazine article about the murder of a woman in our small town.  My then-husband and stepdaughter were important witnesses in the trial of her killer.  The case has always stayed with me.  Although the details in Last Day are changed significantly, the core of the story has always been how a violent crime affects everyone in the family—even friends and neighbors—changes them for life.

Last Day Cover

What is your favorite part of being a writer?  Of the whole writing and publishing process?  What do you think has been your greatest lesson in the journey thus far?

I am grateful for the relationships I have developed throughout my career.  I’ve had the same literary agent from the very beginning, editors I love and with whom I’ve become great friends.  I am in awe of booksellers—how books are their passion, and all they do for writers and readers.  Social media has made it possible to connect more personally with readers; I am touched by their posts and messages, to realize that they’ve been affected by my books.

What piece of advice would you want to share with other writers?

Write every day, don’t let yourself worry about what your mother-husband-best friend-first grade teacher- will think about your work.  Just write it.  Keep the writing between yourself and the page.  Believe in yourself and in the story you are telling.

How important has the New England setting been to your writing?

New England is my heart and soul.  I was born and raised in Connecticut—I still own the family beach cottage built by my grandparents, where I spent every childhood summer.  When I’ve lived far away—New York, Paris, LA, and other places—I’ve sat down at my desk, closed my eyes, and felt New England flooding back to me.  When I was young I went to school in Woods Hole MA, and worked as a maid in Newport RI; I used to go to Belfast and Swan’s Island ME to revise my books—each place inspires me, and I’ve written about them in various novels.

What does your writing space look like? What do you need to have around you while writing or editing?

I love to sit by a window when writing.  There are two baskets on my desk—an old tiger maple table—and they are usually filled with cats.  I have four—Emelina, Orion, Ivy, and Patrick.  My desk overlooks a salt marsh, with incredible bird life—constant activity.  An hour ago bobcat walked across my porch, and Emelina went wild with excitement.  I also love to write in hotel lobbies—I’ll be deep into the story, only slightly aware of the people around me, but suddenly I’ll blink and look up and see an amazing person, or interaction.  It’s all inspiring.

Writers very often have furry or feathered or otherwise non-human companions to “help” them through their work.  Do you? What do you have? How do they “help” (or, “not-help”) with your writing?

Definitely!  (See above…)

Do you have any favorite foods or drinks that must be in the vicinity (or must be avoided) while you’re writing or editing a piece of work?

Lots and lots of black coffee!

What is the greatest lesson you’ve learned, thus far, in your writing career?

That my characters are so much wiser than I am.  I’ve learned to let them tell their stories and not get in their way.  A therapist used to say that my books were predictive—that I would write them, and later something I’d written about would come true in my life.  I think that’s because it’s all so deeply unconscious; writers reach down into parts of themselves they don’t even know exist until they come out on the page.

Thanks so much for taking the time out of your busy schedule to answer our questions, Luanne!

Posted in author spotlight, Friday, interviews, Spotlight | Tagged , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Author Spotlight Friday – Curt Curtin

Curt Curtin Pic

Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester is happy to shine our Friday spotlight on Poet and Author Curt Curtin. Curt will be at Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester on Saturday, February 8th at 2:00 PM to read his poetry and answer any questions people may have. Curt is a lifelong poet with three self-produced chapbooks and many individual poems appearing in journals and other publications. In 2005,  he was the recipient of the Jacob Knight Poetry Award, in 2010 received the Frank O’Hara award for poetry, and in 2019 won second place in the annual contest of the Connecticut Poetry Society. He’s been a featured reader in many poetry venues in Massachusetts and New Hampshire, and twice in Ireland. He taught college English and creative writing at Westfield State University for 20 years. For Art’s Sake is his first full-length collection.

The first question as always: Where can people find your work? (Besides Annie’s Book Stop of Worcester–though they should totally check here first.)

We sell discounted copies of For Art’s Sake at poetry events, several of which are scheduled between now and June 30.  In addition to Annie’s reading on 2/8, the book is currently available at local bookstores and other venues during readings: Tatnuck Bookseller (Westboro—1/26), Barnes & Noble (Worcester—2/22), Bedlam Books Café (Worcester–3/11)  (Worcester), 19 Carter Community Center (Berlin—3/15), The Book Loft (Great Barrington—6/15) and the Poetarium (Southbridge—6/30); we’re in process of getting the books listed on Amazon.com and BN.com.

How can we follow your work and share your awesomeness?

The Worcester County Poetry Association has been wonderful about co-sponsoring events and helping to get the word out about upcoming readings.  Their website, https://worcestercountypoetry.org, is a great source of information about local poets and poetry events, including my own.

 For readers unfamiliar with your work, how would you describe what you write?  What can readers expect from [newest release/spotlighted release]?

My work covers a broad range of themes: science, nature, art, war, family, home. In For Art’s Sake, though each poem was written in its own time, the organization and flow of the book is an intentional effort to integrate them into a single composition that is a tribute to the creative arts. The poems weave among the arts in small groups of two, four or more, each small group responding to paintings, sculpture, music, dance, theater or poetry. Imagine entering a gallery where the art is on the wall or on pedestals with music playing in the background, and suddenly dancers enter the gallery and bring movement to respond to the music; performance artists mimic poses in the sculpture. The flow moves from mood to mood, like moving on to rooms in a gallery where themes or styles are captured. The collection closes with a bit of self-effacing humor about poets and our pretensions. Overall, the book is not structured enough to be considered a symphony, but it is an integrated composition.

For Art's Sake

What cool facts or findings didn’t make it into the book, but you loved discovering?

As a teenager growing up in Boston, I had the unique privilege of being able to attend the Museum of Fine Arts and the Isabella Stuart Gardner Museum for free, and I went there often, taking notes and making sketches of works that moved me.  At the Gardner Museum, I was awestruck by Rembrandt’s painting, “The Storm on the Sea of Galilee.” When it was stolen along with a dozen other paintings in 1990, I felt a personal loss and was moved to write “Abduction at the Gardner.”

What piece of advice would you want to share with other writers?

Having respect for the subject, for the particulars of the people or things addressed in a poem is essential. Study what matters in each poem so that you can find depth in the subject. Read other poets, history, and other good literature. That background will give you a platform from which you can draw themes and metaphors. Finally, pay close attention to sound and sense, not by using rigid meters and end rhymes but by appropriate use of alliteration, internal rhymes, and other tools

What else can we expect from you in the near future?

I have three collections under review, in search of publishers: Weavings: Poems of Science and Soul, Nature’s Eclectic Designs, and Kerry Dancers. I also have two books of poetry for children in development.

 What is one thing that most people don’t realize about you?

In my 20s, I spent a winter living alone in the woods; I was writing and reading the only book in the cabin, The Imitation of Christ by Thomas à Kempis. I wrote many poems during that time but at the end of the winter I burned all that I had written up to that point.

What has been your favorite adventure during your writing career?

In my 30s, I had the opportunity to spend a summer at Oxford University, an important formative experience in itself. During that time, I took a side trip to Scotland and visited a famous pub called “The Castle” in Edinburgh. I caught that experience in a wild poem called “The Castle Pub” after I returned from that trip.

Are there any groups, clubs, or organizations that you would recommend to other writers that have helped you in your career?

As noted above, the Worcester County Poetry Association has been a great resource and source of support. Also, the rich variety of poetry venues in the Worcester area provide support to many poets and other writers.  The Worcester poetry community is very collaborative, offering encouragement to writers at all levels.

Thanks so much for taking the time to answer our questions, Curt. We look forward to seeing you here on February 8th.

Posted in author spotlight, events, Friday, interviews, Local Authors, Spotlight | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment